Is it possible to intentionally cause Google and AWS to block my IP address?

It may sound a little weird. I am validating one of my possible research ideas where I want to see if I can intentionally and effectively make websites such as Google and AWS to block my IP. By “block”, I mean it won’t let me directly access the service, but not necessarily blacklist my IP. For example, the website will ask me to solve a ReCaptcha before I can access its service, instead of telling me service is unavailable.

I know if I send a large number of requests in a short time (i.e., using DoS) it is very likely that I can make it work, but I wonder if there is any other “efficient” way to make it happen. From what I have found here: https://support.google.com/websearch/thread/2596872?hl=en, it mentioned Google may block the following:

  • Sending searches from a robot, computer program, automated service, or search scraper
  • Using software that sends searches to Google to see how a website or webpage ranks on Google
  • Using an app, program or script to perform a large number of searches in a short time

Is it possible that I mimic such a request and cause myself to be blocked in just one or a few requests?

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Author: dovod74538

What happens if a sender changes the TCP window size over multiple packets that have the same ACK number?

I’m currently doing research on evasion attacks that seek to bypass a Deep-learning based Network Intrusion Detection System.

In order to achieve this, I need to know what the constraints are for the TCP window size field in the TCP packet header. Imagine a client has just sent the last TCP-ACK packet to a server in order to complete the 3-way handshake. He then immediately proceeds to send a GET request to the server (these 2 packets are thus sent one after the other, and contain the same ACK-number).

What happens if the TCP window size in the TCP-ACK packet does not match the window size in the TCP packet containing the GET request? Will the receiver simply observe the last value for the window size that he obtained? Or will there be a violation in the TCP protocol in any way? You can assume that the change in window size is very small, and will not cause the buffer to be full.

More generally, if the client sends N uninterrupted packets (e.g. a heavy-load POST request), can he change the window size in each packet header without repercussions?

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Author: Gints Engelen